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Matthew Earl Simpson, MD

Bariatric Surgery
General Surgery
Bariatric Medicine
Trauma Surgery
Surgical Critical Care
Cox Medical Group Physician

Ferrell-Duncan Clinic

1001 East Primrose Street

Springfield, MO 65807

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Accepting New Patients


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417-875-3593

Timothy David Woods, MD

Bariatric Surgery
General Surgery
Surgical Critical Care
Trauma Surgery
Cox Medical Group Physician

Ferrell-Duncan Clinic

1001 East Primrose Street

Springfield, MO 65807

icons

Accepting New Patients


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417-875-2796

Patient Testimonials

Cheryl's Surgical Weight Loss Story

Glyn's Surgical Weight Loss Story

Weight Loss Surgery Options

Gastric Bypass

During gastric bypass, we reroute the flow of food, bypassing part of your digestive tract, and reduce your stomach to the size of an egg. This lowers the amount of calories consumed and absorbed while suppressing hunger and increasing satiety through the production of healthy gut hormones. 

Sleeve Gastrectomy

During a sleeve gastrectomy, part of the stomach is removed, creating a pouch similar to the size and shape of a banana. The new stomach size reduces the amount of food and calories consumed, resulting in weight loss, and produces gut hormones that reduce hunger, increase satiety and control blood sugar. 

Duodenal Switch

The duodenal switch creates a smaller, tubular stomach pouch similar to that of the sleeve gastrectomy. A portion of the small intestine and the small bowel is bypassed to reroute food flow, dramatically reducing the absorption of calories and nutrients. Similar to other procedures, produced gut hormones impact hunger, blood sugar and satiety. Unlike the gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy, however, patients can consume near “normal” amounts of food over time.

Modified Duodenal Switch

The modified duodenal switch creates a smaller, tubular stomach pouch similar to that of the sleeve gastrectomy. The portion of the intestine located after the new sleeve or the duodenum is divided. A loop of the small intestine is attached to the duodenum to bypass about half of the small intestines. This bypass reduces the amount of calories absorbed and limits how long food mixes with bile fluid and other digestive juices.